"What's an appropriate timeframe?"

Is it necessary to go through the onboarding process on each employee's first day, or can I wait a week until there is a group of employees to take through the process?

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My recommendation would be that whenever you bring an employee on board, the hiring manager should have a plan for that employee that is clearly laid out and it should include introducing them to others, facility tour, organization and department overview, job objectives during and after any required training and any HR enrollment/forms stuff. If your company has some of these things as formal programs, you can wait for a small group. For instance we used to due benefit orientation every other Monday. We gave the employees the information to review but had the formal meeting later when we had others. You will have to get some of the HR forms completed right away: I9, Emergency contact, tax and direct deposit forms. Whatever you do, don't have a new employee show up without a plan to welcome them. They need to know you were prepared for them and that you are excited to have them on board.

Posted anonymously on Feb 2, 2010 - 1 Votes - Flag this post

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I'm wondering about this as well. Is it appropriate to have an onboarding period last for a whole month? We don't have formal training in place but there's a lot to learn and I'd like to give the employee enough time to fully understand everything. Also, is it really bad to have a new hire's first day be on a Thursday or Friday? And when is it appropriate to start the process of putting together yearly objectives? Is that considered a part of "onboarding"?

Posted on May 5, 2010
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Posted on May 6, 2010
by semerson - 1 Votes - Flag this post

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For Camerondmj, There are things that you want to accomplish in the first couple of days for sure which would include all of the necessary paperwork etc. But training can last as long as it needs to. Also, I think objectives should be given to employees as soon as they can comprehend what they really mean. Sometimes this can be within the first couple of days. Don't delay... and don't just put them on paper and hand them to the employee. Review each objective and make sure the employee knows what is expected and ask if they have any questions. You can start an employee whenever it makes the most sense to the business. Employers usually start on Mondays or Sundays because they are usually the beginning of "payroll weeks" and it is easier to process the first checks. Just make sure that the employee understands when they will get their first check and what work days will be represented on that first check.

Posted anonymously on May 7, 2010 - 1 Votes - Flag this post

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Thanks for all the help! Our new hire is starting Monday and we've worked out a concise plan that includes training, administrative information, and eventually objective building. Glad to have this clarified.

Posted on May 11, 2010
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Posted anonymously
on Feb 1, 2010

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