"Open Door Policy"

Are open-door policies the norm, now, in the workplace? At one point, this was frowned upon in my company.

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I think it really depends on the company culture and the individual. It's not like having a closed-door policy is a bad thing, it's just the policy that works best for your company and executives.

Posted anonymously on Sep 8, 2010 - 0 Votes - Flag this post

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Not sure why it would be frowned upon as long as managers and employees understand what it means and how to behave. My definition of an Open door policy/environment is that the management team is accessible and the work is one where environment employees know they have access to management above their direct supervisor when they feel it is necessary. I think it is good to have that kind of environment but that doesn't mean that employees should not follow the "chain of command" as the situation merits appropriate. For example, if the supervisor has done something unethical or that was gross misconduct, it may be uncomfortable for the employee to address with their supervisor. Or in any situation where the employee has already tried to address issues with their manager and not satisfied with the response, they should be able to escalate. Senior managers should always ask if the employee has tried to address the issue with their direct manager. When they have, it usually makes for a good listening experience!

Posted anonymously on Sep 8, 2010 - 0 Votes - Flag this post

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Posted anonymously
on Aug 27, 2010

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